Tuesday, 10 April 2018

The Blue Plaque



Back in March just after we had the snow my son had problems getting to work I Oxford so I dropped him off so he did not loose out on his pay. I had read about a Blue plaque  and I wanted to go and get a photo of it as it meant a lot too me.

 This is the old Oxford Instruments building, back in 1972 I walked through the door you see for the first time. I had finished my apprenticeship the weekend before and was starting a new job

 This looks down the side, just you can see an entrance which used to be the loading bay, the building behind was not there but a few outbuildings and a Boathouse which is where OI started life on this plot of ground before expanding to become the one of the biggest manufacturers of Superconducting  Magnets. 























  On the wall near the entrance you can see this Blue plaque. It was unveiled by Sir Martin Wood who started Oxford Instruments 
It tells you that the first Superconducting Magnet for MRI scanning was built in this building


Now you can see why it meant a lot to me, I was there when they built it and remember seeing the first body scanner in the building.

Taking Part in Our World Tuesday

16 comments:

  1. Very interesting personal story. Occasionally I take a drive down memory lane to visit a place I have worked, live, or went to school. Thanks for stopping by Driller's Place and have a blessed week.

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    1. One of my old schools is now a retirement home

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  2. A plaque of your own history!

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    1. Not quite but at least I was involved in some way

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  3. Wow, very impressive. That was something that made a profound change in the medical world.

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  4. Wow!

    We have similar plaques, but generally of a different colour.

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  5. I recently had an MRI scan, so it is very interesting to see where the technique first started.
    Kay
    An Unfittie's Guide to Adventurous Travel

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    1. First one looked nothing like the one you were in

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  6. I remember the '70's so well. How quickly our early life becomes 'history'.

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  7. Wow, what a great plaque to see. Brings back lots of personal memories for you and changed the medical world. Thanks for sharing your story.

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